The ONLY Five States Where You Should Buy Tax Lien Certificates

The ONLY Five States Where You Should Buy Tax Lien Certificates

I get the questions all the time…what are the best states to buy tax lien certificates in?  Like all real estate investments, the natural answer to this is to only buy delinquent tax certificates in areas that you know best—your local market or areas you have other real estate investments in.  However, the explosion of online auctions and wealth of due diligence information on the web has now given us the ability to invest in just about any state that sells tax liens.  I’m not limiting my buying to just Arizona and Colorado which are near me, I now can buy anywhere in the nation.

So, now, there is competition among states for investors—what separates them are their statutes governing tax lien investing (do they favor the investor or the taxpayer?) and the ease of buying the liens (are the auctions online and is the assessor’s information up-to-date?).  Feel free to post your comments and reasons why you think I’m wrong, but below are the only states I feel you need to invest in.

Florida Tax Lien Certificates

Florida tax lien certificates should be at the top of everyone’s list for many reasons: the ease of buying liens at the online auctions, the laws and processing of tax payments are very investor friendly and the online information from assessment data to tax data is very current and accurate compared to other states.  Florida sets the bar for all the other states that sell their property taxes and will set the trend going in the future.  The main downside that there is a lot of competition out there the bring rates down quite a bit—but with Florida being the largest tax lien certificate market out there, you can usually find a niche to buy at higher rates. You can also find out more about Florida tax lien certificates in my Kindle e-book called: A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Florida Tax Lien Certificates.

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Links to 2013 Florida Delinquent Tax Auctions

Links to 2013 Florida Delinquent Tax Auctions

Looking for county information and auction sites for the 2013 Florida Tax Certificate auctions?  Click the links in blue to be taken directly to the county auction information site:

Alachua County             Tax Sale Information   

Baker County                Tax Sale Information 

Bay County                   Tax Sale Information 

Bradford County            Tax Sale Information  

Brevard County             Tax Sale Information  

Broward County            Tax Sale Information 

Calhoun County           Tax Sale Information 

Charlotte County           Tax Sale Information  

Citrus County                Tax Sale Information  

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Three Tax Lien Investing Strategies for the 2012 Florida Delinquent Tax Auction

Three Tax Lien Investing Strategies for the 2012 Florida Delinquent Tax Auction

Continuing on from my previous post on how to prepare for the 2012 Florida delinquent tax auction this June, I mentioned the selecting a strategy prior to the Florida tax auction should be one of the first steps you take.  Some investors may just be interested in only a few properties, but if you’re serious about getting into this market, you’ll need to have a large number of properties ready to bid on.
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Preparing for the 2012 Florida Tax Lien Auction

Preparing for the 2012 Florida Tax Lien Auction

It’s never too early to start to prepare for the biggest tax lien auction in the U.S. — Florida.  The 2012 Florida tax lien auction is the largest by volume with almost $2 Billion in tax liens available for tax lien investors to purchase.  It’s also the easiest state to buy liens in, for anyone.  Most of the counties are online through a couple online tax auction houses.
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Florida Online Tax Certificate Auction Sites

Florida Online Tax Certificate Auction Sites

It’s time for the largest tax certificate auction — FLORIDA!  The Florida tax certificate auction is one of the world’s largest real estate auctions–almost $1 Billion in assets are sold.  Anyone can participate as most of the sales are online.  Florida, by far, is the large tax lien investing market out there.  It’s heavily bid, but if you focus away from the traditional residential real estate bids, you can find yourself with rates up to 18%.

You can find links to the county sites that host auctions here.


Here are the three main tax lien auction houses and their respective counties:

Grant Street

Broward County, Charlotte County, Citrus County, Highlands County, Lake County, Miami-Dade County, Monroe County, Okaloosa County, Osceola County, Pasco County, Pinellas County, St Lucie County and Volusia County.

Real Auction

Alachua County, Brevard County, Columbia County, Dixie County,Duval County, Escambia County, Flagler County, Gladsden County, Gilchrist County, Hendry County, Hernando County, Hillsborough County, Indian River County, Lee County, Levy County, Manatee County, Nassau County, Orange County, Palm Beach County, Polk County, Putnam County, Saint Johns County, Santa Rosa County, Sarasota County, Seminole County, Sumter County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Walton County.

Bid4Assets

According to their website, they will not be participating in the 2011 Florida Tax Certificate Auction.

 

 

Contacting Delinquent Taxpayers in Florida

I received a question from Lee about contacting delinquent taxpayers in Florida. He asks

I have been reading the florida statute on tax liens and it says that if i have a lien on a property i can not contact the owner during the 22 month redemption period. But i can’t find anything that say it’s illegal to contact the owner of a property that is going to a tax deed auction sale. Do you know have any idea?”

Here’s my reply:

“You’re right on the no-contact period.  If you do, the county tax collector has the right to ban you from the next tax auction. On your question, I’ve read thru the statute and have not seen anything specific about not contacting the property owner before a tax deed sale.  I’ve had tax collectors put me in touch with homeowners just prior to a deed sale who were requesting that I allow a postponement of the sale date.  In my opinion, I don’t see anything wrong with it as long as you are not miss representing yourself or the situation. I’m not an attorney so if you think you may be borderline on a situation, I’d ask one familiar with foreclosures and tax deed sales.”

The Florida statute that Lee references about not contacting delinquent taxpayers for two years after April 1st (22 months after the tax certificate sale) can be found here: Title XIV, Chapter 197.432, Paragraph 14.